dr martens triumph shearling endless robocalls to your smartphone

Have you noticed an uptick in those super annoying robocalls, telemarketers, and scams hitting up your smartphone all hours of the day and night? I have, and it’s driving me nuts.

Last month, I had a bogus call to lower my electricity bill. A few weeks ago, it was a pause after I said hello, then a woman saying, “Oh, I’m sorry, I’m adjusting my headset,” before launching into a sales pitch of some sort. And then there’s the daily deluge of numbers that look legit like my daughter’s school calling, or a media outlet from Manhattan only to end up being an obvious scam. “This is George Michael,” says a male caller with a heavy accent, “calling from your online pharmacy with your diet medication.” Talk about adding insult to injury.

Robocall rageAccording to the Federal Communications Commission, there are nearly 2.4 billion robocalls made every month. That’s more than 7 calls per person, according to new research from the YouMail Robocall Index.

At best, the calls are frustrating. At worst,
doc martens mary janes endless robocalls to your smartphone
they’re robbing us blind. So what can we do about it once and for all?

Robocall rageAccording to the Federal Communications Commission, there are nearly 2.4 billion robocalls made every month. That’s more than 7 calls per person, according to new research from the YouMail Robocall Index.

At best, the calls are frustrating. At worst, they’re robbing us blind. So what can we do about it once and for all?

1 Google your own smartphone numberLet’s start with a little self education. How the heck are these criminal callers getting our cell numbers in the first place? If you don’t post it publicly across social media, use it on shady shopping sites, or shout it out to every telemarketer who calls how is it getting out there? The Better Business Bureau recommends Googling your own number. Do it. I’ll wait.

Was it there? Mine was. It might not be alongside your name, but chances are it’s there, collected by a “people search” company like Nuwber that aggregates information from “White Pages listings, Public Records and Social Network Information.” Thanks to modern technology, these lists are now easy for cyber scammers to scrape. And that’s how the the robo games begin.

Let’s start with a little self education. How the heck are these criminal callers getting our cell numbers in the first place? If you don’t post it publicly across social media, use it on shady shopping sites, or shout it out to every telemarketer who calls how is it getting out there? The Better Business Bureau recommends Googling your own number. Do it. I’ll wait.

Was it there? Mine was. It might not be alongside your name, but chances are it’s there, collected by a “people search” company like Nuwber that aggregates information from “White Pages listings, Public Records and Social Network Information.” Thanks to modern technology, these lists are now easy for cyber scammers to scrape. And that’s how the the robo games begin.
doc martens mary janes endless robocalls to your smartphone